About Me

My Photo
CA, United States
age 38

Pre-op picture both feet

Pre-op picture both feet

pre-op picture

pre-op picture

Pre-op picture

Pre-op picture

Post Bilateral Bunionectomy Pictures

Post Bilateral Bunionectomy Pictures

One week post-op

One week post-op

before stitch removal/2 weeks post-op

before stitch removal/2 weeks post-op

before stitch removal/2 weeks post-op

before stitch removal/2 weeks post-op

How I take a bath

How I take a bath

How I climb the stairs

How I climb the stairs

hammer toe with screw/corn removal

hammer toe with screw/corn removal

tailors bunionectomy/corn removal baby toe

tailors bunionectomy/corn removal baby toe

2 weeks post-op

2 weeks post-op

2 weeks post-op

2 weeks post-op

2 weeks post-op / 2 screws in each big toe

2 weeks post-op / 2 screws in each big toe

3 weeks post-op

3 weeks post-op

3 weeks post-op

3 weeks post-op

3 weeks post-op

3 weeks post-op

Friday, May 14, 2010

I had my bilateral bunionectomy, tailors bunion, hammertoe surgery, plus two corns removed May 21, 2010, both feet done at the same time. I requested general anesthesia because the thought of hearing what was going on around me frightened me and the thought of it made me sick. My doctor was ok with my decision. I stayed in the hospital for a few hours after surgery then was sent home. The orthopedic surgeon ( DPM Tony Nguyen Kaiser Permanente San Diego, CA)(I also recommend to have your surgery done by an orthopedic surgeon, not a podiatrist) gave me a nerve block and my foot was totally numb for almost three days. I started taking Vicodin just in case there would be pain after in nerve block wore off but I had little if any pain. I did take 2 vicodins at night, not for pain but just so i could relax. I did however have swelling and the bandages were super tight and extremely uncomfortable. I kept my feet elevated even at night 30 minutes on 30 minutes off for the first week. The swelling went down substantially. I still continue to keep it easy and constantly elevate and ice my feet. I don't ice my feet as much as I did in the beginning. Since I had a bilateral bunionectomy there was no possible way to use crutches. How could I use them when I had both feet worked on. My husband stayed home with me the first week. He'd help me to the restroom but that was very uncomfortable for me. I remembered that I had rented a wheelchair so I had to figure out an easy way to get into it. Make sure that anytime you get up you must have your surgical sandals/shoes on at ALL times. I'm camping out downstairs on a full size air mattress. I would scoot off the bed, scooting to the couch, then while having my back towards the couch I would pull myself up using my arms and heels of my feet. I would then have the wheelchair kinda sideways close to me and once again using my arms would slide my butt onto the chair. I would then roll myself in the chair to the restroom as close to the doorway as I could, take 2 steps on my heels and plopped myself onto the toilet. The hardest part was getting back up. MAKE SURE THE WHEELCHAIR WHEELS ARE ALWAYS LOCKED WHEN GETTING ON AND OFF. Getting to the bathtub upstairs wasn't that difficult. I would get onto the wheelchair as I said before and roll myself to the bottom of the stairs. I would slide off the chair using my arms again. I would have just crawled up forward but was scared to fall backwards so I went up backwards crab-style once again using my arms and heels. Once at the top, I'd scoot myself backwards into the restroom up to the tub, using my arms and heels pulled myself into the bathtub. I'd get undressed in the bathtub, keeping my feet hanging out so they wouldn't get wet. Thank goodness I have a detachable showerhead that allowed me to bathe myself. I would recommend to listen to the doctor when he/she tells you to keep it easy. I am a neat freak and kind of anal when it comes to my home. I'd look around and look at the mess my husband and kids would make. It drives me crazy, but I have to deal with it because my feet are extremely important to me and want a quick recovery with no complications. One week post-op I had my bandages changed. It felt so good to have them off because they were so tight. The doctor said he put them on tight to help swelling and healing. He cleaned the wounds and re-wrapped them tight again. Just to let you know, I did almost faint when they started taking the bandages off and cleaned th wounds, just because I didn't know what to expect. 15 days post-op I had all stitches removed. I once again got clammy, sweaty, and felt like I was going to faint. The baby toes hurt the worst. My two bunions and tailors bunion didn't hurt as much. For those he cut the ends of the stitches off first, then sprayed them with some cold stuff and it burned a little, then he just ripped all of them out. It was painless but scared the heck out of me. I am now 3 weeks and 2 days. He recommended that I purchase New Balance shoes models 1011 or 1123. He wants me to start walking in them around the house so my feet can get used to them but I'm not ready yet. I just got my stitches removed a week ago and still have scabs. I can walk a little here and there, in the house of course with my surgical sandals. I walked to the car in the garage, holding on to things and on my heels. My mom drove me to Walmart and Costco. She pulls right up to the curb in front of the stores and brings me an electric wheelchair from the store. My feet did start throbbing because the blood was rushing to my feet. I got home after 3 hours elevated them and iced them. I feel much better. I go back for a check-up in 2 weeks. For you ladies out there, I would DEFINITELY recommend you schedule your surgery a few days after your last day of your menstrual period.I will keep you posted...

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